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Examining ChatGPT adoption among educators in higher educational institutions using extended UTAUT model

Purpose Based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model, this study aims to explore the factors influencing educators’ acceptance and utilization of chat generative pretrained transformer (ChatGPT) in the context of higher educational institutions. This study additionally examines the moderating influence of trust on the association between intention and adoption of ChatGPT. Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was disseminated to 1,214 educators following the purposive sampling method. The hypothesized relationships between the extended UTAUT model constructs and ChatGPT adoption were examined using structural equation modeling. Findings The results of this study indicate positive impact of ChatGPT adoption and its use behavior (UB) among educators. Performance expectancy, effort expectancy, hedonic motivation, facilitating conditions and habit have a positive impact on behavior intention to use this tool among educators in higher education institutions, However, the educators intend to use ChatGPT in a personal capacity and are negatively influenced by the social groups. Moreover, behavior intention to adopt ChatGPT has a larger effect on the UB due to the higher involvement of trust. Practical implications This research adds to the literature on technology adoption by emphasizing the significance of trust in the adoption of emerging technologies, such as big language models. This study’s findings have implications for ChatGPT technology developers, legislators and academics considering the implementation of ChatGPT for teaching and research. Originality/value This research investigates ChatGPT adoption among higher education educators using the UTAUT model. It emphasizes the role of trust in adoption, highlights key adoption factors and reveals a paradox: educators are personally inclined to use ChatGPT but hesitant due to negative social influence. This study's novelty lies in its focus on trust and its implications for developers, legislators and educators, offering valuable insights for integrating ChatGPT in education.

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Navigating the high school to university transition with social media: intensity of use, sense of belonging, and meaningful change

Purpose This study aims to explore the use and perceptions of social media among university students before and during their transition from high school to higher education. Design/methodology/approach This exploratory, cross-sectional study uses an online survey of 312 undergraduate students at a large public research university in the USA. Findings Active participation was prevalent for connecting with peers, while passive use was high when learning about university-related topics. While at university, social media was most useful for finding campus events and connecting with classmates, but least effective for connecting with instructors. Most participants experienced meaningful change in their social media use from high school to university, which is often attributed to personal growth. Social media intensity correlated weakly but positively with usefulness and sense of belonging. Research limitations/implications The study’s sample from a single university limits generalizability. While similar institutions might show comparable results, variations due to student demographics and differing institutional practices could emerge. The retrospective approach for reporting high school behaviors also poses a limitation. Future research could longitudinally follow students from university search to enrollment and attendance. Practical implications The study recommends universities adjust social media strategies by prioritizing social content, using student ambassadors and customizing feeds. Universities should support students both online and offline, recognizing diverse pathways to belonging. Originality/value This study examines the transition period by asking university students to retrospectively reflect on high school experiences and also report current experiences. It also offers insights into student perceptions of whether their social media use has changed in meaningful ways.

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Improving the Learning Experience of Chinese Masters’ students in UK higher education

ABSTRACT Both challenges and opportunities are inherent with a growth in Chinese international students in UK Higher Education. However, teachers from the West may not understand the differences in Chinese educational practices, which can lead to negative stereotyping of these students as passive and problematic. This paper rejects this deficit perspective, focusing on the views of Chinese students as to what might need to change about the UK teaching and campus environment to improve their learning experience. Two focus groups were held with Chinese social science Masters’ students in a UK university. Some of their key requests included to reduce class sizes; to provide more guidance around study skills; to offer more timely and accessible information; to provide a more flexible range of services and learning support; and to create more social time with staff and other students. The discussions particularly brought out the importance of ‘relational pedagogy’. These requirements will need more staff time and institutional flexibility which will necessitate adequate funding. The authors conclude that, despite Chinese students’ significant contribution to the local economy and to University finances, there does not seem to be a commensurate investment in protecting their wellbeing and ensuring they receive a quality education. We consider it is important to listen to and act on the students’ suggestions outlined here if UK Higher Education is to remain the destination of choice for many Chinese and other international students.

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Critical consciousness among undocumented immigrant college students: Responding to cultural stress and psychological distress.

Cultural stress is experienced by undocumented students when they encounter discrimination in higher education and society. In response, undocumented students engage in critical consciousness, while simultaneously experiencing psychological distress. A conceptual model is introduced to describe the links between cultural stress, critical consciousness development, and psychological distress. One hundred seventy-one undocumented college students were recruited to participate in this study and completed measures of cultural stress (discrimination). They also completed measures of psychological distress, critical consciousness, and social justice self-efficacy and outcome expectations. The proposed model was tested for global fit and path analysis in structural equation modeling. Indirect effects were probed to assess the mediating role of critical consciousness and psychological distress. The model fit the data excellently. Greater discrimination was associated with higher critical consciousness, which in turn was associated with elevated social justice self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Additionally, higher discrimination was also linked to greater psychological distress. The link between cultural stress and critical consciousness was not explained by psychological distress. This research expands theory by articulating the adaptive ways undocumented students respond to the conditions that cause cultural stress and psychological distress. This aligns with a growing literature documenting the psychology of undocumented immigrants' activism and advocacy. Findings may inform interventions by higher education institutional agents and research to offset cultural stress and psychological distress. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

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Ethnic identity centrality across the adult lifespan: Aging, cohort, and period effects among majority and minority group members.

Ethnic identity is a major area of study across many disciplines including psychology, sociology, anthropology, and political science. Yet, little is known about changes in ethnic identity across the adult lifespan, and whether such changes are driven by normal aging processes (aging effects), unique societal influences linked with one's formative years (cohort effects), or social changes during a specific time frame (period effects). We address these key oversights by utilizing 13 annual waves of longitudinal panel data from a nationwide random sample of both ethnic majority (N = 49,660) and Indigenous ethnic minority (N = 8,325) group members in New Zealand to examine changes in ethnic identity centrality using cohort-sequential latent growth modeling. This approach helps to identify changes in mean levels of ethnic identity centrality over time and whether such changes are driven by aging, cohort, and/or period effects. Our data reveal that, among both ethnic majority and ethnic minority individuals, changes in ethnic identity centrality were informed by a combination of normative aging processes, societal circumstances that reflected the unique historical context in which people grew to maturity, and societal changes during the 13 annual assessments of our study. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that ethnic identity centrality in adulthood is subject to lifelong changes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

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Are faculty members aware of global university ranking? A study in the context of a developing country

Purpose The purpose of this study is to measure the awareness of the global university ranking and its parameters among the faculty members at Dhaka University. This also identifies the challenges linked to university ranking and explores opportunities to overcome these challenges. Design/methodology/approach The target population of this study is the faculty members of Dhaka University. This study used the online survey questionnaire method, contacting approximately 2,000 faculty members individually through their email addresses. In total, 311 faculty members responded, and the response rate was 15.55%. Data were collected from September to December 2022, and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used to analyze the survey data. Findings The findings indicate that a majority of the faculty members are acquainted with global university rankings, with Times Higher Education being the most recognized. Faculty members at Dhaka University are confident in their ability to excel in research and citation weighting scores in the ranking parameters. However, challenges such as a lack of incentives, inadequate recruitment policies, limited research funding, minimal collaboration, a scarcity of international students and faculty and limited local journal publications hinder the university’s ranking. Research limitations/implications Due to the limited number of responses, the findings may not accurately represent the entire faculty. The findings of this study can guide Dhaka University and other universities to design policies for overall improvement of university ranking. Originality/value This is the first time an attempt has been made to measure the awareness of university ranking by collecting primary data in the context of a public university in Bangladesh.

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British Bangladeshis

One of the smallest ethnic minority groups in Great Britain, the British Bangladeshi community comprises just 1.1 percent of the population (according to the 2021 census). Predominantly Muslim, this community has longstanding roots in Britain, linked to the British imperial project in India that preceded the disruptions of partition and the later struggle for Bangladeshi independence. British Bangladeshis have a distinctive settlement pattern, with dense concentrations in key urban areas. They are among the most socially and economically deprived groups in Britain and are most often framed through a discourse of disadvantage and discrimination. Nevertheless, the community has also played a crucial role in the struggle against racism and in the formation of modern multicultural Britain, particularly through its key role in the restaurant trade. In the 21st century, the community, largely second- or third-generation British-born, is undergoing a dramatic social transformation. Success in education and rising numbers of young British Bangladeshis in higher education and in all spheres of public life, including politics, the arts, and media, has seen the emergence of a new and confident middle class. Religion, particularly Islam, has come to play a more significant role among younger British Bangladeshis and has challenged the secular nationalism of their parents and grandparents. However, entrenched issues of deprivation in the British Bangladeshi community, alongside racism and Islamophobia, remain an important concern. The story of Bangladeshi Britain is one of empire, global migration, and diaspora. It is also a story of pioneer settlers, who forged new spaces of safety, of home, and of belonging in Britain, in the face of virulent racism and structural exclusion, and whose descendants still face significant barriers of exclusion and racism while building new paths for success.

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Completion of Upper Secondary Mainstream School in Autistic Students in Sweden.

Higher education is an increasingly necessary achievement to attain employment. However, even in cases where a student has the academic skills to succeed, educational environments may not support students across all other domains necessary for education success, including social and communication needs. This is especially true for students with disabilities and autistic students, where the rate of completion of non-compulsory education is unknown. We used the Stockholm Youth Cohort (children aged 0-17 years from 2001 to 2011), a total population cohort (N = 736,180) including 3,918 autistic individuals, to investigate the association between autism without intellectual disability and completion of upper secondary education. We assessed the impact of sex and co-occurring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) on this association. By age 20 years (the expected age of completion), 68% of autistic students and 91% of non-autistic students admitted to upper secondary education had completed. In logistic regression models adjusted for student demographics, autistic students had almost five-fold higher odds of not completing secondary school (OR 4.90, 95% CI 4.56 5.26) compared to their non-autistic peers. Autistic students with ADHD had particularly high odds of non-completion of upper secondary school. Autistic students without intellectual disability attending mainstream education are substantially less likely to complete upper secondary education as compared to their peers. These findings have implications for the appraisal of how inclusive school policies serve autistic students' academic and social needs, ultimately addressing population health and independent living.

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Systemic action learning action research and entrepreneurship momentum development

ABSTRACT Despite various efforts by the Department of Higher Education and Training, innovation and creativity have not been able to develop graduate entrepreneurship through traditional methods contributing to graduate and youth unemployment. This is because of curriculum decay, a lack of skilled academics and technology. An inquiry into the cause of low graduates' entrepreneurship momentum and action informed the need to explore the relationship between systemic action learning action research in transformative learning and entrepreneurship to foster entrepreneurship momentum. Therefore, entrepreneurship education, a learning process ‘about' business and entrepreneurship management and entrepreneurship training ‘for' momentum development are the focus of this study. The study employed a nondualist approach with quantitative design in a longitudinal systemic action learning action research training to develop and activate students' entrepreneurship momentum. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 26 was employed to observe progressive development and relationships between the variables. The study finds systemic learning and transformation theory contribute to entrepreneurial momentum and improve graduates' inventive and creative skills. The study recommends incorporating the SALAR model into curricula and training programmes to equip aspiring ‘studentpreneurs' with systemic problem-solving skills. Policy-makers should recognise and consider incorporating the value of systemic action learning action research in entrepreneurship development..

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