Abstract

Increase in the mean seasonal temperature can reduce the duration of many crops which may lead to final yield reduction. China needs to cope with the adverse effects of climate change by developing heat and drought resistant high yielding varieties and cultivars to ensure food security in China. Farmers should adapt to climate change strategies which integrate traditional experience and indigenous knowledge with scientific researches and government polices as key factors. Climate change will extend growing seasons for some crops and make shorter growing seasons for other crops in Northern part of China and will bring less reliable rains, soils that retain less water, the spread of dangerous pests and unwanted weeds. The catastrophic consequences of climate change can be avoided if all countries work and cooperate together towards significant reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases.

Highlights

  • China encompasses various climate regimes from northern boreal to southern tropical and from western arid to eastern and southern humid climate zones

  • The climate change scenarios considered in their study, agricultural net revenues would increase in most regions of China, except for the Northwest, the Southwest and parts of the Northeast, as a result of the projected increase in temperatures and precipitation levels

  • Ecosystems in northern and western parts of China are more vulnerable to climate changes than those in eastern China, while ecosystems in the east are more vulnerable to land use changes other than climate changes

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Summary

Introduction

China encompasses various climate regimes from northern boreal to southern tropical and from western arid to eastern and southern humid climate zones. China has played a crucial role in advancing key elements of the foundations for future development and the global agenda by taking major steps to advance international cooperation, especially on climate change

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